Posts Tagged ‘Twitter’

09.12

Take Five: Spotlight on Resources for Gifted Learners

By Deborah Mersino

On 09.02.11, our #gtchat session focused on five resources and sites resplendent with information and opportunities for educators, parents, and gifted education advocates. As promised, I am recapping the resources here. Please share these five finds with classroom educators, gifted specialists, administrators, friends, parents, students, and tech lovers. The links are live, so simply scroll over them to access.

{Drum roll, please….}

#1 – www.brianhousand.com

After you take a moment to appreciate the clever logo, dive into this site, designed by  Brian Housand, an Assistant Professor at East Carolina University in the department of Curriculum and Instruction. You’ll be happy you did. Many of you may know Brian from his novel presentations at NAGC, Confratuate, and Edufest (among others). This forward-thinking educator never tires of “exploring ways in which technology can enhance the learning environment” and “striving to define what it means to be creatively productive in a digital age.”

If you click on 2011, 2010, and/or 2009 on www.brianhousand.com, you will see just how busy this digital guru has been. Be sure to click on the “60 in 60” presentation in 2011, where Brian introduces “60 Sites in 60 Minutes.” And although you won’t hear Brian’s riveting dialogue, you will see some of the most current apps and sites worth exploring. You’ll also get a true sense of what the future of education could look like.

#2 – www.byrdseed.com

Perhaps one of the finest gifted education blogs available today, Ian Byrd crafts regular posts to stretch our thinking – and benefit the minds and spirits of gifted learners. Ian has taught in a gifted classroom since 2007 and was a GATE student himself from first through sixth grade. He’s quickly becoming one of the most sought-after speakers for professional development in gifted education. To me, it makes perfect sense. This humble, yet wickedly creative soul has tenaciously devoted himself to making education come alive for gifted learners via sound gifted education practices mixed with relevant life and digital applications. More than 3,400 educators have already signed up to receive his free PDF entitled, “Improve Your Gifted Classroom: 7 Ways in 7 Days.” Whether you’re looking for lesson plans, resources, and/or fresh ideas, Ian’s blog and site will inspire.

#3 – www.everydayintensity.com

During our #gtchat session, I actually shared a different resource in this #3 spot, only to later realize the site had grown cobwebs {gasp} from being poorly managed. In its place, I’m pleased to highlight one of my favorite new streams, the Everyday Intensity blog, which I personally have delivered via email because it’s.that.good. Lisa Rivero has been a strong force for good via social media platforms this past year. She not only serves on the Board of SENG, but also teaches, writes books, and now pens a Creative Synthesis blog for Psychology Today.

In Everyday Intensity, Lisa asks,

  • Do you want to know how to live with more intensity?
  • Are you interested in finding and sharing resources that pertain to intense learners (children and adults), giftedness, creativity, and personal growth?
  • Are you looking for ways to learn about and discuss giftedness that move away from the gifted label?

If you’re looking for wisdom and grounded insights, this site will open your eyes and evoke a sense of community and wonder. You’ll find yourself nodding your head in agreement and shifting your thinking regularly. After all, isn’t that what the best blogs do?

#4 – www.activehistory.co.uk

Russel Tar (@RusselTarr) was one of the first educators I started following on Twitter back in 2009, and he’s still one of the best. Currently working as the Head of History at the International School of Toulouse, Russel has created the ActiveHistory site for teachers and students of World History, and he regularly offers up some of the best history resources on the planet. His site is chock-full of interactive simulations, decision-making games, self-marking quizzes, worksheets, and lesson plans designed to make education captivating.

ActiveHistory has received acclaim throughout the world. The New York Times, The Guardian and other major news outlets have praised the apps on the site, including his Head2Head Interviews, where students can have virtual conversations with historical figures like Hitler or King Henry VIII. Whether you want your students to compare and contrast the rise of power of Mao to Stalin, interview William the Conqueror or pass sentences on criminals living in the 19th Century, this site is for you. Even if you want to devise a new IB Study Unit on Pinochet, he’s got you covered.

Unlike all the other sites listed in this recap, ActiveHistory costs, but it is reasonable. While you can often get free resources from @RusselTarr on Twitter, he does require a small fee to access the full content of the site. Fees for a whole school run $150.00 US/$125 Euros. Single teacher access runs $60 US/$50 Euros. Please let me know if and when you start utilizing this site; I will gladly share your experiences – and those of your students – with others. Personally, I can’t wait to create an online book club in seconds…just one of the many activities available.

#5 – Nicholas Green Distinguished Student Awards

The National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) offers many vital opportunities for educators; however, not everyone may know about this laudable awards program for gifted students in grades 3 through 6.

Please note that the deadline for this year’s awards program has passed. I’m sharing this because I hope you will keep students in mind for next year!

Here’s what the NAGC site says about the awards:

The National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) is pleased to announce the NAGC – Nicholas Green Distinguished Student Awards program for the 2010-2011 school year. Originally funded by the Nicholas Green Foundation and NAGC, this awards program is designed to recognize distinguished achievement in academics, leadership, or the arts, in children grades 3 through 6. NAGC believes that the Nicholas Green Distinguished Student Awards inspire children to achieve to their fullest potential, highlight high-ability students, and draw attention to the educational needs of our nation’s gifted and talented students.

The Nicholas Green Foundation was established by Maggie and Reg Green to honor the memory of their seven-year-old son Nicholas who was killed in a drive-by shooting while visiting Italy in 1994. The Greens paired with NAGC to start the Distinguished Student Awards because they wanted to recognize young people who are: 1.) working hard to make the most of their lives to develop their unique gifts and talents and 2.) around the age of Nicholas at the time of his death.

One child in each state may be named a Nicholas Green Distinguished Student. Each winner receives a $500 U.S. savings bond and an NAGC Certificate of Excellence. Eligible students may be nominated by parents, teachers, students, or community/civic groups.
Thank you to NAGC and Maggie and Reg Green for this program.

So go to the NAGC site, print out the application information, and put it on your bulletin board as an encouraging reminder to think about possible student nominees for next year. During our #gtchat, educator Krissy Venosdale (@KTVee) made this worthy suggestion!

That’s it for this recap; I appreciate you stopping by. My hope is that you will not only check out these resources regularly, but also will gladly share them with others. As always, I welcome your comments.

08.20

10 Ways Social Media and the Web Are Moving Gifted Education Forward

By Deborah Mersino

Amid early adopters, platform loyalists, time and budget constraints, enthusiasm, privacy concerns, real-time collaboration, media hype, avoidance, and resource-sharing, it’s clear that social media is not only alive and well and impacting the world of gifted education, but it is also truly shifting mindsets and creating opportunities.

Here are 10 ways social media and the Web are catapulting the gifted education movement forward. Some of these developments have been around for a while now; others depict social media’s current and future evolution relative to gifted, talented, and creative learners – and those who serve them. Thank you to those who have helped crowdsource many of these points.

Should you have additional ideas to offer, please “Leave a Reply” so others can benefit. If you’re a parent, educator or organizational leader who is just getting started online, welcome! I’m hoping this post inspires you to delve in further. As always, feel free to contact me with your questions and/or consulting needs. Here we go!

1. Down come the walls

Scholars, gifted education specialists, classroom teachers, administrators, parents, counselors, authors, and advocates are communicating outside of their long-standing silos, which is igniting newfound learning and compelling action.

2. Up comes the engagement and true collaboration

Like never before, you will find parents helping parents, teachers supporting parents, parents enlightening teachers, psychiatrists answering parents’ questions, authors asking for input on new books, journalists finding sources, and teachers sharing ideas online with verve.

3. Read all about it

Access to scholarly articles, resources, videos, podcasts, blogs, and news about the gifted movement is allowing more immediate response and action, especially relative to advocacy.

4. Options galore

Whether searching for homeschooling resources and/or garnering assistance with a passion or specific subject area, open-source and distance learning opportunities continue to give gifted, talented, and creative learners more opportunities to learn 24/7 – often in collaboration with other learners throughout the world.

5. Dialogue develops

Real-time chats, like #gtchat on Twitter, continue to boost understanding among varied audiences and remind us all that gifted learners and those who parent and serve them need and deserve ongoing support. Gifted organizations can – and should – begin planning now for virtual conferences to reach broader audiences cost-effectively and efficiently. And while online discussion platforms have served powerfully for years, we’ll continue to see significant growth in this area and other online parent forums in the years ahead.

6. Facebook groups and Google+ Circles provide ideal platforms

Everyday, these tools allow for audiences to witness and participate in Q&A sessions, professional development, and curricula sharing across the globe.

7. Images create momentum and memories

YouTube, Flickr, video blogs, Skype, and Google+ Hangouts are bringing the power and benefits of gifted education and peer interaction to life.

8. Community comes home

Whether a parent or teacher is looking to connect with others about issues of twice-exceptional students, dual-college enrollment, camps for profoundly gifted learners, and/or students in rural areas, today’s social media platforms are making finding one’s tribe not only possible, but also convenient and rewarding.

9. New Zealand informs New York and vice versa

No longer bound by geography, gifted educators, parents, policy makers and advocates are sharing knowledge, resources, and insights globally.

10. Socratic Seminars in Google+ Circles

We’re just at the beginning of transformative learning. Educators at universities and high schools are already seeing the power of shared learning through social media tools. Group projects and real-time dialogue between professors and students, mentors and students, and learners from different countries will continue to ignite ideation and solutions. Here’s just one of hundreds of examples of an organization recognizing the need to “get it” soon: Stanford University GSB Seeking Social Media & Email Marketing Manager, Marketing & Communications.

No Limits

What impresses me most is the intense commitment shown by teachers who are creating, sharing, and applying the latest social media tools and apps to their curriculum. Parents and students are just now seeing the seeds of true engagement. And we haven’t even scratched the surface yet.

As more private gifted schools, gifted nonprofits, publishers, and psychiatrists adjust their views of social media, they will stop “marketing” to target audiences and begin engaging them. They will cross the aisle to communicate with other fields. They will tap advertising and online sponsorship options instead of simply signing up to be a vendor at a traditional, in-person conference or expecting others to manually visit their Web site without interaction. Those who don’t may soon find themselves struggling, wondering why conference attendance rates, revenues, and donations are down, and/or finally realizing they’re becoming obsolete despite long-standing leadership in the past.

It can be hard sometimes to fully comprehend the complexities inherent in the intersection of social media, education, and marketing. Leaders who see behind the predominant myths and embrace the possibilities truly will be the ones shaping the future. Here’s to all of you who are open to seeing these new realities!

07.06

Global #gtchat Sponsors Rock; It’s Time to Share Your Gratitude!

Global #gtchat has become a vibrant hub of sharing, dialogue, and collaboration among parents of gifted learners, educators, psychologists, scholars, and advocates throughout the past 18 months. We’ve grown from small group of early adopters to a wide range of participants from all over the world. New faces continue to pop up in our #gtchat stream each week. It’s a privilege and an honor to see the interactions, learning, and outcomes resulting from this growing group of impassioned advocates.

Your Voice Matters – A Chance to Thank Our Sponsors

I wanted to give you each an opportunity to say a quick thank you to our Global #gtchat Sponsors. If you have benefitted in any way throughout the past year and a half from your interactions on #gtchat and/or via the connections you’ve made, would you “Leave a Reply” for our Global #gtchat Sponsors below? Taking a minute or two to share your appreciation and how you’ve benefitted from #gtchat will help our Sponsors realize how valuable their support is to you – and all of us who have dreams of growing awareness and collaborating on behalf of gifted learners!

Our #gtchat sessions would not be possible without the generous support of our Global #gtchat Sponsors. Personally, I cannot thank the Gatton Academy and the Summer Enrichment Program at the University of Northern Colorado enough for their early support of this new platform. I’m also pleased to announce the Gifted Development Center (GDC) in Denver has become our newest Global #gtchat Sponsor. You’ve likely heard me raving about GDC’s services recently, and I’m thrilled to be able to have this organization on board for the next year.

In addition to commenting below, be sure to “like” these inspiring organizations on Facebook, follow them on Twitter, and/or check out their Web sites. You’ll find lots of useful information! Here are the links for you:

Thank you in advance for taking time out of your busy schedules to acknowledge these supporters! You rock too.

Fondly,

Deborah Mersino

12.22

Looking Back and Ahead with Gratitude

2010 has proven to be a year of growth, learning and global collaboration. I wanted to pause for a moment and share my appreciation for the following highlights. None of these milestones would have been possible without your support, input and inspiration:

  • Building a growing, active and generous tribe filled with linchpins!
  • Attracting more than 12,500 unique visitors from 62 countries to the Ingeniosus Web site in just 9 months and receiving more than 230,000 hits to the site since March.
  • Writing and publishing the following articles:
    • “Seven Guidelines for Parents of Gifted: How to Advocate Intelligently in a Tough Economy” in Understanding Our Gifted, Spring 2010. Thank you, Carol Fertig!
    • “Twitter and Gifted Education: How Social Networking Can Propel Advocacy and Learning” in Parenting High Potential, March 2010.
    • “Twitter and Gifted Education: Part II” in Parenting High Potential, June 2010. Thank you, Jennifer Jolly!

So, thank you all. Your support, participation, questioning, ideas and passion have ignited new life into the advocacy movement on behalf of these bright and creative students. And I feel so very fortunate to be on this journey with you.

Beginning in January, I hope to help take our digital movement even further, as I hone in on those areas which I feel can make the most impact. I look forward to watching you all lead in your strength areas. You motivate me daily.

In the year ahead, Ingeniosus will be offering companies, schools, individuals and non-profit organizations serving gifted and talented communities the following menu of options to increase their influence and impact:

  • Linchpin Business Reviews (LBR)
  • Strategic Marketing Consulting Services
  • Social Media Trainings
  • Global #gtchat Sponsorships/Advertising

I will also be working to ensure #gtchat continues to evolve, so that parents, educators and advocates from throughout the world can share information and resources in real-time, enjoy a sense of kinship, break down barriers and influence outcomes that benefit students.

Join me in celebrating all that we have accomplished together in such a short time. Well done! I raise my glass to you and look forward to an incredible 2011!

Warmest regards,

Deborah Mersino

11.10

Atlanta News | Tweetup on Friday at NAGC!

I’m delighted to be in Atlanta for NAGC’s 57th Annual Conference! It’s sure to be a phenomenal week of learning and collaborating. A few updates:

  • Global #gtchat: We will be having one #gtchat session at 7:00 p.m. (EST) on Friday, November 13th. Our topic will be “Drive: Motivation and the Gifted Child.” Join us! If you’re new to Twitter and want more information on #gtchat, click here.
  • Meet f2f (face-to-face) in Atlanta: I’m helping to orchestrate an #NAGC #Tweetup! Whether you are active on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and/or other social networking sites – or simply interested in learning more – be sure to mark your calendars. We will be gathering Friday night (after #gtchat) at 8:30 p.m. in the Lobby Bar on the 5th floor of the Westin Peachtree Plaza. Follow @DeborahMersino on Twitter and/or “like” the Ingeniosus Facebook Page and stay tuned for details. And plan to keep Friday night open; our #NAGC #Tweetup will be informal and fun! (Note: everyone will pay for their own beverages). If you know for sure that you’re coming, let me know!
  • Get the Latest News: I will be posting live updates from NAGC via Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn, so feel free to connect and enjoy. I’ll be using the #NAGC hashtag on Twitter (and know others, like @PrufrockPress, will be as well). How exciting!
  • Learn More About the Power of Social Networking: I’m honored to be a part of a timely and informative panel discussion with Joel McIntosh, publisher of Prufrock Press, Carolyn K. of Hoagies Gifted Education Page and Ian Byrd of Byrdseed.com, being offered at NAGC on Saturday at 2:30 p.m. We would love to see you. Click here for more information on this session!
  • Get Your Questions Answered: Have a question about social networking and/or wonder how your school district, summer program, counseling center and/or business might benefit? Feel free to send me an email. I will be happy to answer your questions and/or set up a time to chat.

For those who can’t be in Atlanta, you might want to check out the NAGC 2010 Virtual Conference.

To our friends in Texas, here’s wishing you all a successful TAGT conference! And to everyone near and far, here’s to you! Just consider how social networking has exploded in 2010. So many of you are helping to ignite this potent collaboration on behalf of gifted learners worldwide. Just think of what can be done in 2011 and beyond!

Warmest regards,

Deborah Mersino